GUEST OF HONOUR – Chuck Rainey, electric bass

shapeimage_4We are delighted to have recording legend Chuck Rainey as our Guest of Honour on our 10th Anniversary event, 2015. Chuck will give daily masterclasses and there will be one public  interview with a panel of musicians from our faculty, on Saturday 25 July at 3pm, Hawks Well Theatre..

As a member of The King Curtis All-Stars, he toured with the Beatles on their second run across the U.S. By the beginning of the 1970s, Rainey had firmly established his place as one of New York City’s first call session bass guitarists.[citation needed]

In 1972, he released his first solo album The Chuck Rainey Coalition on Skye Records. The coalition consists of notable session musicians Richard Tee, Warren Smith, Specs Powell, Eric Gale, Bernard Purdie, Herb Lovelle, Cornell Dupree and Billy Butler.

Moving to Los Angeles in 1972, his work with Quincy Jones continued as a member of Jones’ big band, and Rainey continued to work as a studio musician on others albums like, Betty Davis‘ famously shelved session from 1976 or Tim Buckley’s Greetings from L.A. About this time, he bumped into friend and Steely Dan producer Gary Katz, which led to performing on tracks for Pretzel Logic by Steely Dan. His relationship with Steely Dan continued through Katy Lied; The Royal Scam, Aja, where he performs on every track except “Deacon Blues” (Walter Becker played bass for that track); and Gaucho.

Rainey’s style has always been to provide a rhythmic and melodic bottom that works with the drummer for the benefit of the song. His books on bass study refer to a “sensitivity to music” and a dedication to studying the fundamentals of music theory. While his “sideman” philosophy of bass has not brought him the level of recognition of star players such as Jaco Pastorius, Rainey is by far more recorded than his more famous contemporaries.[1]

In a career spanning several decades, Chuck Rainey toured and/or recorded with some of the most prominent artists in music history. They include Steely Dan, King Curtis, Sam Cooke, Etta James, The original Coasters, Jackie Wilson, Harry Belafonte, Al Kooper, The Supremes, Labelle, Aretha Franklin, Roberta Flack and Quincy Jones.

At one time tagged as the hardest working bass player in America, Chuck Rainey’s bass playing on successful television shows, motion pictures and recordings illustrate his well-known and legendary style, feel and concept for the instrument and it’s role in organized music. His unique bass lines accent numerous commercials and are an integral part of today’s music across many music viewing and listening fronts.

Chuck joins the group of a selected few ‘music sidemen’ who have been a recipient of prestigious awards. They include; 17 platinum or gold records, The Dean Markely ‘Life Time Of Achievement’ Award, Bass Player Magazine/New York Bass Collective ‘Life Time achievement’ Award, a record 35 year consecutive placement in the top 10 music poll (category – bass) in Downbeat and Playboy Magazines and the list goes on.

Chuck Rainey’s music activities in education reach far out into the world’s organized music communities. As music education is a vital part of his playing career and experience, his textbooks and educational video’s are tools used by many educators in the curricula of their local institutions. Self reliant students are also attracted to his learning tools.

Having written and taught the first bass course curricula for The Musicians Institute/B.I.T. and Dick Grove Music Works Shops, Adds to his experience in the field of music education. He was among the first celebrated musicians to write teaching columns in Guitar Player and Bass Player Magazines in the 70’s. His early monthly columns alongside the crew of that time, set the format of success inherited by columnist writing the same columns today.

The ‘Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame’ yearly inducts the legends of Rock music. As of 2003, Chuck Rainey’s bass lines and rhythm influence are the documented backbone of the original hit recordings of the following artist and the year they were inducted: Aretha Franklin (1987), Marvin Gaye (1988), The Jackson 5 (1997), The Rascals (2000), Steely Dan (2001).

At this time, no side musician enjoys more legendary honor, prestige, fame or current influence in music.

CHUCK RAINEY’S   WIKIPEDIA PAGE SAYS:

As a member of The King Curtis All-Stars, he toured with the Beatles on their second run across the U.S. By the beginning of the 1970s, Rainey had firmly established his place as one of New York City’s first call session bass guitarists.[citation needed]

In 1972, he released his first solo album The Chuck Rainey Coalition on Skye Records. The coalition consists of notable session musicians Richard Tee, Warren Smith, Specs Powell, Eric Gale, Bernard Purdie, Herb Lovelle, Cornell Dupree and Billy Butler.

Moving to Los Angeles in 1972, his work with Quincy Jones continued as a member of Jones’ big band, and Rainey continued to work as a studio musician on others albums like, Betty Davis‘ famously shelved session from 1976 or Tim Buckley’s Greetings from L.A. About this time, he bumped into friend and Steely Dan producer Gary Katz, which led to performing on tracks for Pretzel Logic by Steely Dan. His relationship with Steely Dan continued through Katy Lied; The Royal Scam, Aja, where he performs on every track except “Deacon Blues” (Walter Becker played bass for that track); and Gaucho.

Rainey’s style has always been to provide a rhythmic and melodic bottom that works with the drummer for the benefit of the song. His books on bass study refer to a “sensitivity to music” and a dedication to studying the fundamentals of music theory. While his “sideman” philosophy of bass has not brought him the level of recognition of star players such as Jaco Pastorius, Rainey is by far more recorded than his more famous contemporaries.[1]